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Persian leopard fact file

Persian leopard description

Also known as
north Persian leopard.
Size
Head-body length: 91 - 191 cm Persian leopard biology

Leopards in general have a broad diet and are able to adapt to fluctuations in availability of prey Persian leopard range

The largest population of Persian leopards is found in Iran, with smaller populations occurring in Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey, Russian North Caucasus and possibly in Pakistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan Persian leopard habitat

The Persian leopard mainly inhabits remote and mountainous areas including dry, arid environments through to lush, deciduous forests and snowy ranges mammals

Persian leopard status

Classified as Endangered (EN) on the IUCN Red List Persian leopard threats

The relatively large geographic range of the Persian leopard belies its low overall population size. In 2005, it was estimated that less than 1,300 cats were left in the wild and these were to be found in small and increasingly fragmented populations Persian leopard conservation

The Persian leopard is classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List and in the absence of targeted conservation faces a very real threat of extinction in the wild Find out more

For further information on the Persian leopard see:

  • IUCN/SSC Cat Specialist Gromammals

    Authentication

    Authenticated (16/11/2008) by Arash Ghoddoosi, Head of Research and Biodiversity at the Plan for the Land Society,
    http://www.plan4land.org

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Glossary

Gestation
The state of being pregnant; the period from conception to birth.
Nocturnal
Active at night.
Subspecies
A population usually restricted to a geographical area that differs from other populations of the same species, but not to the extent of being classified as a separate species.
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References

  1. IUCN Red List (April, 2008)
    http://www.iucnredlist.org/
  2. Nowak, R.M. (1999) Walker's Mammals of the World. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland.
  3. CITES (April, 2008)
    http://www.cites.org
  4. Sunquist, M. and Sunquist, F. (2002) Wild Cats of the World. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago.
  5. Nowell, K. and Jackson, P. (1996) Wild Cats Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland.
  6. Khorozyan, I., Malkhasyan, A. and Azmaryan, S. (2005) The Persian leopard prowls its way to survival. Endangered Species UPDATE, 22(2): 51 - 60. Available at:
    http://www.carnivoreconservation.org/files/issues/leopard_persian_survival.pdf
  7. Kiabi, B.H., Dareshouri, B.F., Ghaemi, R.A. and Jahanshahi, M. (2002) Population status of the Persian leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor Pocock,1927) in Iran. Zoology in the Middle East, 26: 41 - 47.
  8. Ghoddousi, A. (2008) Pers. comm.
  9. Khorozyan, I. (2002) Assessment of adverse human impact on biodiversity in Armenia’s premier wilderness areas, Khosrov Reserve and Gndasar Mt./Noravank Canyon. The Whitley Laing Foundation for International Nature Conservation/Rufford Small Grant programme, UK. Available at:
    http://www.ruffordsmallgrants.org/Projects/reports/khorozyan_report_nov_2002.doc
  10. Ghoddousi, A., Kh. Hamidi, A., Ghadirian, T., Ashayeri, D., Hamzehpour, M., Moshiri, H., Zohrabi, H. and Julayi, L. (2008) Territorial marking by Persian leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor Pocock, 1927) in Bamu National Park, Iran. Zoology in the Middle East, 44: 101 - 103.
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Image credit

Male Persian leopard  
Male Persian leopard

© Behzad Farahanchi

Behzad Farahanchi
Iran/Tehran
bfarahanchi@gmail.com
http://www.behzadfarahanchi.com

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KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassMammalia
OrderCarnivora
FamilyFelidae
GenusPanthera